Gidgalang Kuuyas Naay Secondary School

 

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Next game starting momentarily. See Mr. Q’s livestream for the game!GKNSS girls Soccer game vs CHSS
Going live at noon today
Gidgalang Kuuyas Naay Secondary School
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Next game starting momentarily.  See Mr. Q’s livestream for the game!

Are you 16 or older? Check out an opportunity for a summer internship. ... See MoreSee Less

Are you 16 or older?  Check out an opportunity for a summer internship.Image attachment

Good evening. Due to mechanical issues, the Sandspit bus route from Sandspit to Aliford Bay will be cancelled for the morning and afternoon on Thursday, April 11, 2024. The bus stopping at Skidegate Landing remains unaffected, and students arriving off the ferry will be taken to school. We apologize for any inconvenience. ... See MoreSee Less

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Way to play, Levi! Well deserved!

Bird House Fundraiser for GKNS Shop Program. $20 a house. Call the school! 250 559-8822 ... See MoreSee Less

Bird House Fundraiser for GKNS Shop Program.  $20 a house.  Call the school!  250 559-8822

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

Thanks everyone for the amazing support! We are making a few more and should be able to get some for everyone that asked. But we have to close orders now.

I’d get two

I’d like one, please. Will be there sometime this week.

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Sport.

Such a small word. Oxford Languages defines sport as “an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment”.

I wonder if that definition is enough to truly understand what the word means, and how it fits into humanity’s various societies and cultures. After all, there is no question that, if we are open to the lessons, we learn things from sport.

Of course, the first and most obvious thing that comes to mind is how to win and how to lose. Victory is more than the joy of defeating an opponent. Winning means getting to appreciate the rewards of working hard, accepting and showing leadership, and of overcoming setbacks and challenges. And losing can teach us to come back, to accept that there is room for improvement, and to strive to match the challenge of filling that room. If only one kid learned the value to the human soul of achievement through hard work and cooperation, sport would be worth investment. But, I would argue that there are greater lessons to learn than winning or losing.

We just saw a team from a small school achieve something great. Second place? Sure that’s admirable. And I know that there is disappointment that the gold medal was so close, but was ultimately elusive. No, the great achievement lay somewhere else. The Breakers that made it to the Boys’ 1A Provincial tournament represent the communities, the volunteerism, the community support of Daajing Giids, Skidegate, Sandspit, and Port Clements. This is not a story about who won. This is a story about athletes that are ethnically and culturally diverse, that saw past their differences to find a common love of basketball, a common goal, and a commitment toward each other to pursue that goal together. A diverse group of kids and coaches, under the flags of Canada and British Columbia, stood arm in arm, singing the National Anthem of a sovereign Indigenous Nation without thinking too much about what that might mean, whether it was a first, or what some people might think of it. They did that because that’s who they are. Kids from Haida Gwaii. And who they are was on display in that ceremony, as well as in how they played - with determination, with heart, and supporting one another - and they left everything on the floor.

The world should be paying attention. Everyone should know this story. If governments worked the way the Breakers work, not just this years’ boys’ basketball team, but all of our teams, most of the world’s problems would be behind us. But to our basketball team after this remarkable season, I say you should be proud. I know it’s not the end you fought so hard for. But second place in the Province is amazing, and you achieved so much more than that. You made an impact. I watched as experienced teams changed the way they played to try to stop you. You showed them they weren’t ready. Then you showed everyone that small can mean mighty if we work together, work past our differences, and work toward common goals. You offered the world a glimpse of how things could be. How things should be.

No one saw you coming. No one thought you were a danger. Well, they know now. They’re not talking about other teams in the news. They’re talking about the Breakers. They’re talking about Haida Gwaii. And for a brief time there, everyone watching was a Breaker. You did that.

But everyone here always knew. To all the coaches, to all the athletes, to all the volunteers, to all the families that supported you, to Gwaii Trust, to School District 50, to Haida Gwaii, congratulations. Now it’s time to look ahead. What’s next? To all of our Breakers, I know you’ll approach the future in the same spirit of diversity and cooperation, and with the same determination as we saw this past week.

Go Breakers!
... See MoreSee Less

Sport.

Such a small word.  Oxford Languages defines sport as “an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment”.  

I wonder if that definition is enough to truly understand what the word means, and how it fits into humanity’s various societies and cultures.  After all, there is no question that, if we are open to the lessons, we learn things from sport.

Of course, the first and most obvious thing that comes to mind is how to win and how to lose.  Victory is more than the joy of defeating an opponent.  Winning means getting to appreciate the rewards of working hard, accepting and showing leadership, and of overcoming setbacks and challenges.  And losing can teach us to come back, to accept that there is room for improvement, and to strive to match the challenge of filling that room.  If only one kid learned the value to the human soul of achievement through hard work and cooperation, sport would be worth investment. But, I would argue that there are greater lessons to learn than winning or losing.  

We just saw a team from a small school achieve something great.  Second place?  Sure that’s admirable.  And I know that there is disappointment that the gold medal was so close, but was ultimately elusive.  No, the great achievement lay somewhere else.  The Breakers that made it to the Boys’ 1A Provincial tournament represent the communities, the volunteerism, the community support of Daajing Giids, Skidegate, Sandspit, and Port Clements. This is not a story about who won.  This is a story about athletes that are ethnically and culturally diverse, that saw past their differences to find a common love of basketball, a common goal, and a commitment toward each other to pursue that goal together.  A diverse group of kids and coaches, under the flags of Canada and British Columbia, stood arm in arm, singing the National Anthem of a sovereign Indigenous Nation without thinking too much about what that might mean, whether it was a first, or what some people might think of it.  They did that because that’s who they are.  Kids from Haida Gwaii.  And who they are was on display in that ceremony, as well as in how they played - with determination, with heart, and supporting one another - and they left everything on the floor.  

The world should be paying attention.  Everyone should know this story.  If governments worked the way the Breakers work, not just this years’ boys’ basketball team, but all of our teams, most of the world’s problems would be behind us.  But to our basketball team after this remarkable season, I say you should be proud.  I know it’s not the end you fought so hard for.  But second place in the Province is amazing, and you achieved so much more than that.  You made an impact.  I watched as experienced teams changed the way they played to try to stop you.  You showed them they weren’t ready.  Then you showed everyone that small can mean mighty if we work together, work past our differences, and work toward common goals.  You offered the world a glimpse of how things could be.  How things should be.  

No one saw you coming.  No one thought you were a danger.  Well, they know now.  They’re not talking about other teams in the news.  They’re talking about the Breakers.  They’re talking about Haida Gwaii.  And for a brief time there, everyone watching was a Breaker.  You did that.  

But everyone here always knew.  To all the coaches, to all the athletes, to all the volunteers, to all the families that supported you, to Gwaii Trust, to School District 50, to Haida Gwaii, congratulations.  Now it’s time to look ahead.  What’s next?  To all of our Breakers, I know you’ll approach the future in the same spirit of diversity and cooperation, and with the same determination as we saw this past week.  

Go Breakers!

21 CommentsComment on Facebook

Outstanding!! What an inspiration!!

Wonderful words, and congratulations to everyone! I hope this story goes across the country!

Beautiful words. Happy tears and pride, way to represent❤️

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Way to go Breakers! Congratulations to Teemo, player of the game. What a nail biter win over the Hornets.

We’re in the final. Tomorrow 12:30. Catch the action on stretch TV! Go Breakers!
... See MoreSee Less

Way to go Breakers!  Congratulations to Teemo, player of the game.  What a nail biter win over the Hornets.  

We’re in the final.  Tomorrow 12:30.  Catch the action on stretch TV!  Go Breakers!Image attachment

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

Congratulation Temo great accomplishment 😊 proud of you and your team

Amazing Young Man 😇👌

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Gidgalang Kuuyas Naay

Pronunciation

School Staff

Deavlan Bradley Principal
Colin Greenough Administrative Assistant
Megan Romas Clerk/MyED BC Level 1/Librian
Rachel Fraser Teacher
James Reid Teacher
Debi Laughlin Teacher
Marcia Malloy Teacher
Jenny Parser Teacher
Stephen Querengesser Teacher
James Warner Teacher
Jenna Perry Learning Resource Teacher
Jo Halle Teacher
Ruben Jatel Teacher
Russ Fleming Distributed Learning Teacher
Tiffany Lavoie District Psychologist
Jennifer Byrne-Wissink Counsellor
Jo-ann MacMullin Education Assistant
Kris Olsen Education Assistant
Colleen Bradley Education Assistant
Robert Vogstad Indigenous Resource Worker
Food Coordinator

School Resources & Information

Contact Us

Gigdalang Kuuyas Naay Secondary School
PO Box 70
701 Oceanview Dr
Daajing Giids, BC V0T 1S0

Tel.: 250-559-8822
Fax: 250-559-8328

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